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Media Contact: Holly Korschun
  (404) 727-3990
23 March 2004
Dr. Carlos del Rio Will Discuss Infectious Threats in Emory "Great Teachers Lecture"
In the past 30 years, more than 30 new biological agents have been identified in the United States, in addition to new twists on old familiar infectious disease "favorites" such as influenza and pneumonia. Combine deadly emerging infectious diseases such as SARS, West Nile virus, virulent new strains of flu and an ongoing global pandemic of HIV/AIDS with the threat of terrorist attacks using biological agents, and you have a list to occupy the attention of numerous public health and infectious diseases experts.

Carlos del Rio, MD, has spent many years working with a variety of infectious disease threats in the United States and in other countries, from prevention, to research, to patient care, and to public health policy in a wide range of populations and healthcare settings. As part of Emory University's Great Teachers Lecture Series, Dr. del Rio will discuss the challenges of anticipating, preparing for, preventing, diagnosing and treating both old and new infectious disease threats.

His lecture, entitled "Old and Emerging Threats: From Smallpox to Monkeypox to SARS," will be held Thursday, April 15 at 7:30 p.m. at Emory's Miller-Ward Alumni House at 815 Houston Mill Road. The lecture is free, open to the public and does not require reservations. Free parking is available at the Alumni House. For further information, contact the Emory Center for Lifelong Learning at 404-727-6000.

Dr. del Rio is professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Emory University School of Medicine, chief of medical services at Grady Memorial Hospital and associate director for clinical science and international research in the Emory Center for AIDS Research (CFAR). He is program director of the Emory AIDS International Training and Research Program and co-director of the Emory School of Medicine's Internal Medicine Residency Program and a member of the Emory-led Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats (SECEBT). He is a native of Mexico, where he was executive director of the National AIDS Council of Mexico, the Mexican government agency responsible for AIDS policy throughout the country.

© Emory University 2018

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