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Media Contact: Holly Korschun
  hkorsch@emory.edu
  (404) 727-3990
23 April 2008
Madlala-Routledge Speaks as Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Emory Global Health Institute
Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge, an outspoken and controversial member of the Parliament of the Republic of South Africa, will speak at Emory this week as part of her visiting fellowship at the Emory Global Health Institute.

Madlala-Routledge will present "Democracy Needs Leaders Who are Prepared to Serve the People," on Wednesday, April 23 at 4 p.m. in the School of Medicine Education Building, Room 120, 1648 Pierce Drive.

During her tenure as former Deputy Minister of Health under President Thabo Mbeki, Madlala-Routledge led the way in efforts to stem South Africa's HIV/AIDS epidemic through science-based treatments such as antiretroviral therapy. Madlala-Routledge was dismissed amid controversy last year from her post as Deputy Minister of Health following an unauthorized trip to an AIDS vaccine conference in Spain as well as comments about the dismal conditions at South Africa's East London Frere Maternity Hospital, a site of high infant mortality.

Madlala-Routledge's work to turn back South Africa's relentless rise in HIV/AIDS cases challenged other officials' assertions that the disease did not exist, and that even if it did, specific foods, such as garlic, could be considered suitable treatments for HIV/AIDS.

In addition to serving as Deputy Minister of Health, Madlala-Routledge served as Deputy Minister of Defense pushing for South Africa's military to serve primarily as a peacekeeping force in the region.

"We are honored to host Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge as our first Distinguished Visiting Fellow," says Jeffrey P. Koplan, MD, MPH, vice president for global health and director of the Emory Global Health Institute. "Her courageous actions on behalf of HIV/AIDS research and treatment are a shining example of the individual resolve that is required in the face of daunting public health challenges."

The Emory Global Health Institute, established in 2006, supports Emory faculty, students and alumni and global partners in their quest to find innovative solutions to critical global health problems. Emory's current partnerships in global health include a joint vaccine center in India; a public health partnership in Mexico; HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis work in Zambia; diabetes research in India; nutrition research in Central America and Eastern Europe; avian influenza research in China; improvements in emergency room services in the Republic of Georgia, and infectious disease research in South Africa.

© Emory University 2018

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