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Media Contact: Jennifer Johnson 02 May 2007
  jennifer.johnson@emory.edu    
  (404) 727-5696 ((40) 4) -727-5696   Print  | Email ]
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Emory University Neurologist to Present on Dizziness and Physical Therapy
An Emory University medical expert will address the value of starting physical therapy early after the onset of balance or dizziness problems at an upcoming international neurology conference. Ronald Tusa, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, is presenting on the topic of vestibular rehabilitation, or balance rehabilitation, at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) 59th Annual Meeting in Boston on May 2.

Dr. Tusa, director of the Emory University Dizziness and Balance Center, will give neurology professionals attending the half-day course an overview of the assessment and treatment of a patient with dizziness, including physical therapy, medication, lifestyle changes and surgery.

"There are several causes of dizziness, each of which requires a different form of management," says Dr. Tusa. "Virtually all causes of dizziness can be treated with medication, diet or physical therapy. If physical therapy is the chosen route to rehabilitation, it should not only be initiated early for optimal results, but the person should continue exercising to retain his or her improvement."

Dizziness is lightheadedness, feeling like you might faint, being unsteady, experiencing a loss of balance or vertigo - a feeling that you or the room is spinning or moving. Dizziness can affect any age group, but is most prevalent in the elderly, explains Dr. Tusa. It may come from a variety of causes such as eye movement disorders, diseases of the inner ear and migraines. Accurate diagnosis of the root cause of the dizziness is key to effective treatment.

Emory's Dizziness and Balance Center uses a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment. It features physicians and therapists trained in neurology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, psychiatry and physical therapy. Specialized equipment, including a rotary chair to measure eye movements during head rotation and a dynamic platform posturography to test balance, help provide key information to aid in proper diagnosis.

Dr. Tusa is among a group of Emory University neurologists attending and presenting at the AAN Annual Meeting. It is one of the world's largest gatherings of neurology professionals, bringing together more than 10,000 neurologists and neuroscientists to share research and participate in a comprehensive curriculum-based educational program.

Media Contact: Jennifer Johnson 02 May 2007
  jrjohn9@emory.edu    
  (404) 727-5696   Print  | Email ]
Share:

del.icio.us

Emory University Neurologist to Present on Dizziness and Physical Therapy
An Emory University medical expert will address the value of starting physical therapy early after the onset of balance or dizziness problems at an upcoming international neurology conference. Ronald Tusa, MD, PhD, professor of neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, is presenting on the topic of vestibular rehabilitation, or balance rehabilitation, at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) 59th Annual Meeting in Boston on May 2.

Dr. Tusa, director of the Emory University Dizziness and Balance Center, will give neurology professionals attending the half-day course an overview of the assessment and treatment of a patient with dizziness, including physical therapy, medication, lifestyle changes and surgery.

"There are several causes of dizziness, each of which requires a different form of management," says Dr. Tusa. "Virtually all causes of dizziness can be treated with medication, diet or physical therapy. If physical therapy is the chosen route to rehabilitation, it should not only be initiated early for optimal results, but the person should continue exercising to retain his or her improvement."

Dizziness is lightheadedness, feeling like you might faint, being unsteady, experiencing a loss of balance or vertigo - a feeling that you or the room is spinning or moving. Dizziness can affect any age group, but is most prevalent in the elderly, explains Dr. Tusa. It may come from a variety of causes such as eye movement disorders, diseases of the inner ear and migraines. Accurate diagnosis of the root cause of the dizziness is key to effective treatment.

Emory's Dizziness and Balance Center uses a multidisciplinary approach for diagnosis and treatment. It features physicians and therapists trained in neurology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, psychiatry and physical therapy. Specialized equipment, including a rotary chair to measure eye movements during head rotation and a dynamic platform posturography to test balance, help provide key information to aid in proper diagnosis.

Dr. Tusa is among a group of Emory University neurologists attending and presenting at the AAN Annual Meeting. It is one of the world's largest gatherings of neurology professionals, bringing together more than 10,000 neurologists and neuroscientists to share research and participate in a comprehensive curriculum-based educational program.



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