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Media Contact: Lance Skelly 26 March 2007
  lskelly@emory.edu    
  (404) 686-8538 ((40) 4) -686-8538   Print  | Email ]
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Emory Presents 2007 Second Century Awards to Four Health Care Leaders
Four distinguished health care leaders who have significantly impacted the care of countless Atlantans were recently presented with Second Century Awards, as nominated by Emory University Hospital and Emory Crawford Long Hospital employees and staff members.

In 2006, Emory Hospitals hosted its first leadership recognition event. There are separate awards for each hospital: the Dr. Wadley R. Glenn Awards at Emory Crawford Long Hospital and the Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans Awards at Emory University Hospital. For each award, two individuals are recognized for their transformational contributions to each hospital - a volunteer/philanthropist - and a physician.

This year's awards (outlined first by namesake) and recipients are as follows:

The Wadley R. Glenn Award -- Emory Crawford Long Hospital

Under Dr. Wadley R. Glenn's leadership, Emory Crawford Long Hospital created Atlanta's first blood bank and first premature baby nursery, a nuclear medicine unit and the Carlyle Fraser Heart Center. A skilled surgeon known for his advocacy of the patient and his commitment to clinical excellence, Dr. Glenn became the hospital's second medical director in 1953. His legacy bridges the accomplishments of Emory Crawford Long's founders to the present. His family's generosity made possible the Wadley R. Glenn Chair in Surgery at Emory Crawford Long Hospital.

    Adeline "Coc" Henson

    Forty years ago, a friend suggested that Mrs. Coc Henson volunteer at Emory Crawford Long Hospital. She began by wheeling the candy and magazine cart into patient rooms and eventually she became so central to the life of the Emory Crawford Long auxiliary that today it's impossible to imagine the auxiliary without her. She oversaw the gift shop, helped organize a Christmas gift program for staff, co-edited a successful cook book and planned dozens of fundraisers. Most importantly, Mrs. Henson brought comfort to countless patients and families who, finding themselves away from home during difficult times in their lives, needed someone to listen and understand.

    Since Mrs. Henson began volunteering, the auxiliary has raised several million dollars for Emory Crawford Long Hospital. It has helped fund major renovations, provided high-tech equipment for the special care nursery, outfitted the endoscopic surgery room and purchased a specialized laser that lessens the trauma of laryngeal surgery (making Emory Crawford Long the second facility in the nation to offer patients this remarkable new technology).

    Dr. Harold S. Ramos

    Although he retired as medical director in 2006, Dr. Harold Ramos still boards MARTA before dawn each day and rides to Emory Crawford Long, where he reads EKGs for the Carlyle Fraser Heart Center.

    First recruited to strengthen medical education and staff development at the hospital, Dr. Ramos joined Emory's School of Medicine in 1963 as professor of medicine and director of medical education, and there began his passionate interest in cardiology and his lifelong commitment to teaching. A strong leader, he helped establish a coronary care unit at Emory Crawford Long, served on the Woodruff Health Sciences Center Board of trustees, and succeeded Wadley Glenn as medical director of Emory Crawford Long. Dr. Ramos chaired Emory Crawford Long's first ethics committee, which became one of 12 national testing sites for a new curriculum designed to teach hospital staff and physicians how to handle end-of-life decisions.

    A compassionate physician, respec ted leader and understanding teacher, Dr. Ramos has cared for the people of Georgia for more than 40 years. He has given the best of himself to Emory Crawford Long Hospit al, saving lives and inspiring generations of students to pursue principled careers in medicine.

The Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans Award -- Emory University Hospital

As one of the original bottlers of Coca-Cola, Joseph B. Whitehead and his family achieved great business success. Following Mr. Whitehead's death at age 41, his widow, Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans (she later remarried), and two sons carried on the family business and quietly joined the ranks of the nation's foremost charitable benefactors. The family's largesse has been a vital part of Emory university Hospital's transformation into a leading medical center for patient care, research and education, as evidenced by the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building, the Joseph B. Whitehead Chair of Surgery, and the Conkey Pate Whitehead Surgical Pavilion of Emory university Hospital (includes the Whitehead Memorial Room).

    William C. "Billy" Warren, III

    Mr. Billy Warren's was born at Emory University Hospital into a family overflowing with Emory friends, alumni and benefactors. His father earned a medical degree at Emory. His great grandfather, Asa Griggs Candler, founder of the Coca-Cola Company, was one of Emory's biggest supporters. When Mr. Warren earned his business degree from Emory in 1953 his maternal grandfather - Emory Board of Trustees Chairman Charles Howard Candler - handed him his diploma.

    Now an active member of the Woodruff Health Sciences Center Board of Trustees, as well as the boards of Emory Healthcare and the Emory Clinic, Mr. Warren devoted has his time and energy to Emory as a university trustee for 21 years and still serves as a trustee emeritus. He's a former member of the Emory Board of Visitors, represented his class in the Sesquicentennial Convocation in 1986, worked on behalf of Emory's Loyalty Fund, chaired the Emory Merit Plan Drive and led the initial fund drive for Emory Wesley Woods Hospital.

    Mr. Warren is among the key volunteers who helped create today's Woodruff Health Sciences Center, a national model for academic health centers. His philanthropic commitments have supported faculty and physicians at Emory university Hospital, Emory Crawford Long and Wesley Woods, and his support of education has helped prepare the next generation of outstanding clinicians and researchers.

    Dr. Charles R. Hatcher, Jr.

    The product of a small town in South Georgia, Dr. Charles Hatcher, Jr. decided at an early age to become a surgeon and give back to his home state. Taking his first job in 1962 as an assistant professor of surgery, he began a series of firsts and bests that would save lives, educate some of the nation's most talented surgeons and strengthen Emory and its communities in ways no one ever imagined.

    During his first year on the job, Dr. Hatcher performed Georgia's first successful "blue baby" operation, ushering in a new era of heart surgery for the state. Soon after that, he performed Georgia's first double, then triple heart valve replacements and, in 1970, the state's first coronary bypass, all at Emory University Hospital. At age 41, he was named Emory's chief of cardiothoracic surgery. Emory quickly became one of the nation's largest centers for open-heart surgery, one of few accepting the sickest patients while reducing mortality rates dramatically.

    In 1976, Dr. Hatcher was unanimously elected director of The Emory Clinic, and in 1984 he became vice president for health affairs and director of the Woodruff Health Sciences Center. With his support, Emory helped establish Morehouse School of Medicine by providing clinical education to students in Morehouse College's new MD program. He was influential in bringing the American Cancer Society to Atlanta and he helped create the Emory Heart Center. Under Dr. Hatcher's leadership, Emory launched Georgia's first school of public health, the Rollins School of Public Health, and Emory's health sciences research funding and facilities grew dramatically, as did patient care at Emory's hospitals and The Emory Clinic.

Media Contact: Lance Skelly 26 March 2007
  lance.skelly@emory.edu    
  (404) 686-8538   Print  | Email ]
Share:

del.icio.us

Emory Presents 2007 Second Century Awards to Four Health Care Leaders
Four distinguished health care leaders who have significantly impacted the care of countless Atlantans were recently presented with Second Century Awards, as nominated by Emory University Hospital and Emory Crawford Long Hospital employees and staff members.

In 2006, Emory Hospitals hosted its first leadership recognition event. There are separate awards for each hospital: the Dr. Wadley R. Glenn Awards at Emory Crawford Long Hospital and the Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans Awards at Emory University Hospital. For each award, two individuals are recognized for their transformational contributions to each hospital - a volunteer/philanthropist - and a physician.

This year's awards (outlined first by namesake) and recipients are as follows:

The Wadley R. Glenn Award -- Emory Crawford Long Hospital

Under Dr. Wadley R. Glenn's leadership, Emory Crawford Long Hospital created Atlanta's first blood bank and first premature baby nursery, a nuclear medicine unit and the Carlyle Fraser Heart Center. A skilled surgeon known for his advocacy of the patient and his commitment to clinical excellence, Dr. Glenn became the hospital's second medical director in 1953. His legacy bridges the accomplishments of Emory Crawford Long's founders to the present. His family's generosity made possible the Wadley R. Glenn Chair in Surgery at Emory Crawford Long Hospital.

    Adeline "Coc" Henson

    Forty years ago, a friend suggested that Mrs. Coc Henson volunteer at Emory Crawford Long Hospital. She began by wheeling the candy and magazine cart into patient rooms and eventually she became so central to the life of the Emory Crawford Long auxiliary that today it's impossible to imagine the auxiliary without her. She oversaw the gift shop, helped organize a Christmas gift program for staff, co-edited a successful cook book and planned dozens of fundraisers. Most importantly, Mrs. Henson brought comfort to countless patients and families who, finding themselves away from home during difficult times in their lives, needed someone to listen and understand.

    Since Mrs. Henson began volunteering, the auxiliary has raised several million dollars for Emory Crawford Long Hospital. It has helped fund major renovations, provided high-tech equipment for the special care nursery, outfitted the endoscopic surgery room and purchased a specialized laser that lessens the trauma of laryngeal surgery (making Emory Crawford Long the second facility in the nation to offer patients this remarkable new technology).

    Dr. Harold S. Ramos

    Although he retired as medical director in 2006, Dr. Harold Ramos still boards MARTA before dawn each day and rides to Emory Crawford Long, where he reads EKGs for the Carlyle Fraser Heart Center.

    First recruited to strengthen medical education and staff development at the hospital, Dr. Ramos joined Emory's School of Medicine in 1963 as professor of medicine and director of medical education, and there began his passionate interest in cardiology and his lifelong commitment to teaching. A strong leader, he helped establish a coronary care unit at Emory Crawford Long, served on the Woodruff Health Sciences Center Board of trustees, and succeeded Wadley Glenn as medical director of Emory Crawford Long. Dr. Ramos chaired Emory Crawford Long's first ethics committee, which became one of 12 national testing sites for a new curriculum designed to teach hospital staff and physicians how to handle end-of-life decisions.

    A compassionate physician, respec ted leader and understanding teacher, Dr. Ramos has cared for the people of Georgia for more than 40 years. He has given the best of himself to Emory Crawford Long Hospit al, saving lives and inspiring generations of students to pursue principled careers in medicine.

The Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans Award -- Emory University Hospital

As one of the original bottlers of Coca-Cola, Joseph B. Whitehead and his family achieved great business success. Following Mr. Whitehead's death at age 41, his widow, Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans (she later remarried), and two sons carried on the family business and quietly joined the ranks of the nation's foremost charitable benefactors. The family's largesse has been a vital part of Emory university Hospital's transformation into a leading medical center for patient care, research and education, as evidenced by the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building, the Joseph B. Whitehead Chair of Surgery, and the Conkey Pate Whitehead Surgical Pavilion of Emory university Hospital (includes the Whitehead Memorial Room).

    William C. "Billy" Warren, III

    Mr. Billy Warren's was born at Emory University Hospital into a family overflowing with Emory friends, alumni and benefactors. His father earned a medical degree at Emory. His great grandfather, Asa Griggs Candler, founder of the Coca-Cola Company, was one of Emory's biggest supporters. When Mr. Warren earned his business degree from Emory in 1953 his maternal grandfather - Emory Board of Trustees Chairman Charles Howard Candler - handed him his diploma.

    Now an active member of the Woodruff Health Sciences Center Board of Trustees, as well as the boards of Emory Healthcare and the Emory Clinic, Mr. Warren devoted has his time and energy to Emory as a university trustee for 21 years and still serves as a trustee emeritus. He's a former member of the Emory Board of Visitors, represented his class in the Sesquicentennial Convocation in 1986, worked on behalf of Emory's Loyalty Fund, chaired the Emory Merit Plan Drive and led the initial fund drive for Emory Wesley Woods Hospital.

    Mr. Warren is among the key volunteers who helped create today's Woodruff Health Sciences Center, a national model for academic health centers. His philanthropic commitments have supported faculty and physicians at Emory university Hospital, Emory Crawford Long and Wesley Woods, and his support of education has helped prepare the next generation of outstanding clinicians and researchers.

    Dr. Charles R. Hatcher, Jr.

    The product of a small town in South Georgia, Dr. Charles Hatcher, Jr. decided at an early age to become a surgeon and give back to his home state. Taking his first job in 1962 as an assistant professor of surgery, he began a series of firsts and bests that would save lives, educate some of the nation's most talented surgeons and strengthen Emory and its communities in ways no one ever imagined.

    During his first year on the job, Dr. Hatcher performed Georgia's first successful "blue baby" operation, ushering in a new era of heart surgery for the state. Soon after that, he performed Georgia's first double, then triple heart valve replacements and, in 1970, the state's first coronary bypass, all at Emory University Hospital. At age 41, he was named Emory's chief of cardiothoracic surgery. Emory quickly became one of the nation's largest centers for open-heart surgery, one of few accepting the sickest patients while reducing mortality rates dramatically.

    In 1976, Dr. Hatcher was unanimously elected director of The Emory Clinic, and in 1984 he became vice president for health affairs and director of the Woodruff Health Sciences Center. With his support, Emory helped establish Morehouse School of Medicine by providing clinical education to students in Morehouse College's new MD program. He was influential in bringing the American Cancer Society to Atlanta and he helped create the Emory Heart Center. Under Dr. Hatcher's leadership, Emory launched Georgia's first school of public health, the Rollins School of Public Health, and Emory's health sciences research funding and facilities grew dramatically, as did patient care at Emory's hospitals and The Emory Clinic.



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