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Media Contact: Jennifer Johnson 20 March 2007
  jennifer.johnson@emory.edu    
  (404) 727-5696 ((40) 4) -727-5696   Print  | Email ]
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Cardiovascular Risk Factors & Disease Help Predict Problems within First Year of Diagnosis
Diagnosis of cardiovascular risk factors or existing cardiovascular disease can help predict likelihood of adverse vascular events in the first year after such conditions have been found, says Peter W.F. Wilson, MD, professor of medicine (cardiology) at Emory University, a study co-author in an article reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week.

"In other words," notes Dr. Wilson, "when a person experiences more disease points in the cardiovascular system, it raises the possibility for heart attack, stroke or possibly death."

Atherothrombosis is a term used by the researchers that covers a range of cardiovascular problems. This term includes coronary artery disease, or CAD, which occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle (the coronary arteries) become hardened and narrowed; cerebrovascular disease, or CVD, which occurs when the cerebral blood flow and vessels cannot adapt well to environmental insults such as ischemia, inflammation, trauma, blood pressure changes and metabolic stressors; and peripheral artery disease, or PAD, which occurs when a fatty material called plaque builds up on the inside walls of the arteries that carry blood from the heart to the head, internal organs and limbs.

The study was conducted by an international team of researchers using a large database of people living in 44 countries around the world. Called the REACH Registry, this database includes more than 68,000 people that researchers study to learn more about cardiovascular disease. These individuals either had at least three risk factors for atherothrombosis or already had atherosclerotic arterial disease.

The researchers found that persons with three or more risk factors had a 5 percent event rate over one year. In comparison, persons with one, two, or three symptomatic disease locations had event rates of approximately 13 percent, 21 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

According to researchers, recent U.S. data have confirmed that the absolute number of deaths from these conditions continues to increase, and prevalence is sharply increasing in other parts of the world. Thus, atherothrombotic diseases are, and are projected still to be, the leading cause of death worldwide by 2020, states the study report. The authors say that the medical community needs to do more to improve patient outcomes.

"Initiatives to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines and care are an important tool in this respect," says Dr. Wilson.

###

The REACH Registry is sponsored by Sanofi-Aventis, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and the Waksman Foundation (Tokyo). Dr. Wilson is a member of the REACH Registry executive committee and has been a recipient of a grant from Sanofi-Aventis.

Media Contact: Jennifer Johnson 20 March 2007
  jrjohn9@emory.edu    
  (404) 727-5696   Print  | Email ]
Share:

del.icio.us

Cardiovascular Risk Factors & Disease Help Predict Problems within First Year of Diagnosis
Diagnosis of cardiovascular risk factors or existing cardiovascular disease can help predict likelihood of adverse vascular events in the first year after such conditions have been found, says Peter W.F. Wilson, MD, professor of medicine (cardiology) at Emory University, a study co-author in an article reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week.

"In other words," notes Dr. Wilson, "when a person experiences more disease points in the cardiovascular system, it raises the possibility for heart attack, stroke or possibly death."

Atherothrombosis is a term used by the researchers that covers a range of cardiovascular problems. This term includes coronary artery disease, or CAD, which occurs when the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle (the coronary arteries) become hardened and narrowed; cerebrovascular disease, or CVD, which occurs when the cerebral blood flow and vessels cannot adapt well to environmental insults such as ischemia, inflammation, trauma, blood pressure changes and metabolic stressors; and peripheral artery disease, or PAD, which occurs when a fatty material called plaque builds up on the inside walls of the arteries that carry blood from the heart to the head, internal organs and limbs.

The study was conducted by an international team of researchers using a large database of people living in 44 countries around the world. Called the REACH Registry, this database includes more than 68,000 people that researchers study to learn more about cardiovascular disease. These individuals either had at least three risk factors for atherothrombosis or already had atherosclerotic arterial disease.

The researchers found that persons with three or more risk factors had a 5 percent event rate over one year. In comparison, persons with one, two, or three symptomatic disease locations had event rates of approximately 13 percent, 21 percent and 27 percent, respectively.

According to researchers, recent U.S. data have confirmed that the absolute number of deaths from these conditions continues to increase, and prevalence is sharply increasing in other parts of the world. Thus, atherothrombotic diseases are, and are projected still to be, the leading cause of death worldwide by 2020, states the study report. The authors say that the medical community needs to do more to improve patient outcomes.

"Initiatives to improve adherence to evidence-based guidelines and care are an important tool in this respect," says Dr. Wilson.

###

The REACH Registry is sponsored by Sanofi-Aventis, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and the Waksman Foundation (Tokyo). Dr. Wilson is a member of the REACH Registry executive committee and has been a recipient of a grant from Sanofi-Aventis.



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