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Media Contact: Lance Skelly 28 April 2004
  lskelly@emory.edu    
  (404) 686-8538 ((40) 4) -686-8538   Print  | Email ]
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Emory Cardiologists Train Physicians on New Stent System
The Circulatory System Devices Panel of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last week recommended approval of a new system to clear blocked neck arteries. The system is a minimally invasive alternative to carotid endarterectomy (surgical removal of arterial plaque) in high-risk patients with carotid artery disease. This is the first system of its kind to be recommended for FDA approval.

Carotid artery disease -- a buildup of atherosclerotic plaque (fatty material) in major vessels of the neck that supply blood to the brain -- is an important risk factor for stroke. Stroke is the nation's third leading cause of death and a major cause of serious, long-term disability. The Cordis Carotid System includes a stent that comes with a tiny filter to catch clots stirred up by the procedure before they float to the brain.

Emory cardiologists are designing and rolling out the training program for physicians across the country to use the new stent system. Tomorrow, fifty physicians will be the first in the nation to undergo the metric-based simulator training, meaning physicians' performances will be measured to benchmarks.

"Emory is creating the training programs for this new, cutting edge treatment. Metric-based training is so important in sensitive procedures like this. Doctors learn on a simulator until they are proficient, working in life-like settings. This is truly changing the way we are learning and teaching medicine," said Christopher Cates, MD, associate professor of medicine at the Emory School of Medicine.

The simulators look like a human mannequin. During the training sessions, physicians will thread a catheter through the groin and will be able to view angiograms of the "patient." Physicians will work on the simulator until they are proficient, based on objective benchmarks.

WHAT: ENACT 2004 - Emory Neuro Anatomy Carotid Angiography Training Course -- the first metric-based simulator training course for carotid angiography training.

WHO: Emory Cardiologists Christopher Cates, MD, FACC; Khusrow Niazi, MD, FAAC; and Karthic Kasirajan, MD

WHEN/ WHERE: Wednesday, April 28, 2004 Noon - 5 p.m. Dr. Cates is available for interviews from noon - 1 p.m. The Emory Conference Center

MEDIA COVERAGE: To interview Dr. Cates or view the simulator training, please contact Cindy Sanders at 404-686-8538, ID #12831.

Media Contact: Lance Skelly 28 April 2004
  lance.skelly@emory.edu    
  (404) 686-8538   Print  | Email ]
Share:

del.icio.us

Emory Cardiologists Train Physicians on New Stent System
The Circulatory System Devices Panel of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) last week recommended approval of a new system to clear blocked neck arteries. The system is a minimally invasive alternative to carotid endarterectomy (surgical removal of arterial plaque) in high-risk patients with carotid artery disease. This is the first system of its kind to be recommended for FDA approval.

Carotid artery disease -- a buildup of atherosclerotic plaque (fatty material) in major vessels of the neck that supply blood to the brain -- is an important risk factor for stroke. Stroke is the nation's third leading cause of death and a major cause of serious, long-term disability. The Cordis Carotid System includes a stent that comes with a tiny filter to catch clots stirred up by the procedure before they float to the brain.

Emory cardiologists are designing and rolling out the training program for physicians across the country to use the new stent system. Tomorrow, fifty physicians will be the first in the nation to undergo the metric-based simulator training, meaning physicians' performances will be measured to benchmarks.

"Emory is creating the training programs for this new, cutting edge treatment. Metric-based training is so important in sensitive procedures like this. Doctors learn on a simulator until they are proficient, working in life-like settings. This is truly changing the way we are learning and teaching medicine," said Christopher Cates, MD, associate professor of medicine at the Emory School of Medicine.

The simulators look like a human mannequin. During the training sessions, physicians will thread a catheter through the groin and will be able to view angiograms of the "patient." Physicians will work on the simulator until they are proficient, based on objective benchmarks.

WHAT: ENACT 2004 - Emory Neuro Anatomy Carotid Angiography Training Course -- the first metric-based simulator training course for carotid angiography training.

WHO: Emory Cardiologists Christopher Cates, MD, FACC; Khusrow Niazi, MD, FAAC; and Karthic Kasirajan, MD

WHEN/ WHERE: Wednesday, April 28, 2004 Noon - 5 p.m. Dr. Cates is available for interviews from noon - 1 p.m. The Emory Conference Center

MEDIA COVERAGE: To interview Dr. Cates or view the simulator training, please contact Cindy Sanders at 404-686-8538, ID #12831.



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