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Media Contact: Ron Sauder 22 June 2004
  ron.sauder@emory.edu    
  (404) 727-4499 ((40) 4) -727-4499   Print  | Email ]
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Emory Alumnus to Be Awarded Presidential Medal of Freedom
Dr. Arnall Patz, a Georgia native who earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from Emory University and went on to become one of the world's leading ophthalmologists, will be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bush in a White House ceremony on Wednesday, June 23.

Dr. Patz is credited with saving the sight of countless premature infants by proving, early in his career, that the high levels of oxygen commonly used to treat them caused a condition called retrolental fibroplasia, marked by a proliferation of blood vessels that irreversibly damaged the retina. In 1956, this work earned him the Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Research, which was presented to him by Helen Keller.

Along with colleagues at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Dr. Patz went on to pioneer the development and use of argon lasers to treat diabetic retinopathy and other degenerative eye diseases.

He became a full-time faculty member at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1970 and served as the director of Johns Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute, one of the world's top-ranked centers for eye care and research, from 1979 to 1989.

"I am delighted by this extremely well deserved recognition for Arnall Patz," said Michael M.E. Johns, MD, executive vice president for health affairs at Emory University. "As a former professor of otolaryngology and dean of medicine at Johns Hopkins, I feel privileged to have known Dr. Patz for 20 years. He has been a colleague, friend and mentor. He is one of those rare individuals who has displayed outstanding talents as a scientist, physician, teacher, and academic leader, and he is fully deserving of this high honor."

Dr. Patz earned his undergraduate degree in 1943 from Emory College, followed by his medical degree in 1945 from the Emory University School of Medicine, in the accelerated year-round program that was designed to produce more medical doctors during World War II. A native of Elberton, Georgia, he resides in Baltimore with his wife, Ellen, and has four children and eight grandchildren.

The Presidential Medal of Freedom is the nation's highest civilian award. The award was established by President Truman in 1945 to recognize civilians for their wartime service. President Bush will recognize 12 recipients tomorrow, including Pope John Paul II, Arnold Palmer, and Doris Day.

Media Contact: Ron Sauder 22 June 2004
  rsauder@emory.edu    
  (404) 727-4499   Print  | Email ]
Share:

del.icio.us

Emory Alumnus to Be Awarded Presidential Medal of Freedom
Dr. Arnall Patz, a Georgia native who earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from Emory University and went on to become one of the world's leading ophthalmologists, will be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bush in a White House ceremony on Wednesday, June 23.

Dr. Patz is credited with saving the sight of countless premature infants by proving, early in his career, that the high levels of oxygen commonly used to treat them caused a condition called retrolental fibroplasia, marked by a proliferation of blood vessels that irreversibly damaged the retina. In 1956, this work earned him the Albert Lasker Award for Clinical Research, which was presented to him by Helen Keller.

Along with colleagues at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, Dr. Patz went on to pioneer the development and use of argon lasers to treat diabetic retinopathy and other degenerative eye diseases.

He became a full-time faculty member at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1970 and served as the director of Johns Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute, one of the world's top-ranked centers for eye care and research, from 1979 to 1989.

"I am delighted by this extremely well deserved recognition for Arnall Patz," said Michael M.E. Johns, MD, executive vice president for health affairs at Emory University. "As a former professor of otolaryngology and dean of medicine at Johns Hopkins, I feel privileged to have known Dr. Patz for 20 years. He has been a colleague, friend and mentor. He is one of those rare individuals who has displayed outstanding talents as a scientist, physician, teacher, and academic leader, and he is fully deserving of this high honor."

Dr. Patz earned his undergraduate degree in 1943 from Emory College, followed by his medical degree in 1945 from the Emory University School of Medicine, in the accelerated year-round program that was designed to produce more medical doctors during World War II. A native of Elberton, Georgia, he resides in Baltimore with his wife, Ellen, and has four children and eight grandchildren.

The Presidential Medal of Freedom is the nation's highest civilian award. The award was established by President Truman in 1945 to recognize civilians for their wartime service. President Bush will recognize 12 recipients tomorrow, including Pope John Paul II, Arnold Palmer, and Doris Day.



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