WHSC News and 
Information 


WHSC News Releases for October




 

October 31, 2001

Emory Research: Drug Coated Stents May Keep Arteries Open
Emory cardiologists at Emory University Hospital and Crawford Long Hospital are participating in a new clinical trial, called DELIVER, to study a drug-coated stent that holds the promise of virtually eliminating restenosis (re-narrowing of arteries) following angioplasty by halting the proliferation of endothelial cells — cells that line the blood vessels.
FULL STORY

October 31, 2001

Emory Scientists Study How Anti-Oxidants May Help -- or Hurt -- Heart Health
According to popular consumer books on nutrition, antioxidants like vitamin C, E and beta carotene are panaceas of health that can help prevent heart disease. Now, an internationally recognized expert on antioxidants and their role in health, Emory scientist Sampath Parthasarathy, Ph.D., says taking antioxidants - at least when you first start to exercise - could potentially endanger your heart health.
FULL STORY

October 29, 2001

Three Emory Flight Helicopters Take Wing Across Georgia
Emory Healthcare has signed an agreement with Rocky Mountain Helicopters, effective Thursday, October 25, to assume medical oversight for three specially equipped A-star 350 helicopters based in Griffin, Jefferson and Cartersville.
FULL STORY

October 29, 2001

Adolescent Depression Research Project Shows Strong Results In Helping Girls Live Happier, Healthier Lives
Girls who have been physically or sexually abused become less depressed, their families function better, and school attendance and grades improve when they receive mental health services, according to a research study being conducted by the Emory University School of Medicine at Grady Health System. The project, Adolescent Depression Empowerment, is now in its third year and intends to find therapies to help African-American females between the ages of 12 and 16 years who have a history of physical and/or sexual abuse.
FULL STORY

October 27, 2001

Turner Foundation Funds Lupus Research at Emory
Through a $1 million gift from the Turner Foundation, researchers in Emory University's Division of Pediatric Rheumatology and Immunology will work to uncover new knowledge about a poorly understood autoimmune disorder and how it affects children and teens. This is a one-time grant for medical research from the Foundation.
FULL STORY

October 15, 2001

Don't Let the Threat of Terrorism Literally Break Your Heart: Taking Care of Yourself in an Uncertain World
Does the ongoing war on terrorism, including the possible use of biological and chemical attacks on the U.S., have you so stressed out you are forgoing your exercise routine or turning to junk food for comfort? If the answer is "yes", you need to consider the possible health consequences, according to Emory Heart Center cardiologists.
FULL STORY

October 15, 2001

Emory Names Dr. Jeff Carney as Chief of Urology at Grady Memorial Hospital
K. Jeff Carney, MD, Pharm.D., assistant professor at Emory University School of Medicine and urology surgeon, is the new chief of urology at Grady Memorial Hospital. Carney, who is the first physician to hold the position full-time, began working at Grady Aug. 1. His specialties include general urology, oncology, trauma and reconstructive surgery.
FULL STORY

October 12, 2001

Chest Pain Center at Grady Memorial Hospital Helps Save Time and Lives When Diagnosing Heart Attacks
Getting medical attention for someone who is having a heart attack is a matter of life or death. And getting them to the hospital in time for proper treatment is often the deciding factor.
FULL STORY

October 12, 2001

Emory Eye Center Reports Important Findings from National AREDS Study: Macular Degeneration Progression Can Be Slowed for Those at High Risk
Titled the Age- Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), the clinical trial was conducted at 11 centers across the country, including the Emory Eye Center. The results show that there is a relatively simple way to help prevent the progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in patients at high risk of the disease. "This is a particularly important finding since prior to this study, there was no way to slow the progression of AMD," says principal investigator Daniel F. Martin, M.D., a vitreoretinal specialist at the Emory Eye Center. The AREDS was sponsored by the National Eye Institute (NEI), one of the federal government's National Institutes of Health. The study's findings are reported in the October issue of Archives of Ophthalmology.
FULL STORY

October 11, 2001

Global Nursing Partnerships Conference Addresses International Nursing Shortage
ATLANTA---International nursing experts and healthcare planners from around the globe will meet at The Carter Center in Atlanta Oct. 15-19 to tackle the global nursing workforce crisis. The international nursing conference, "Global Nursing Partnerships: Strategies for a Sustainable Nursing Workforce," is the first ever global invitational forum involving representatives from both governments and nursing associations, including government chief nursing officers, national and international nursing association leaders, and human resource directors/health planners.
FULL STORY

October 4, 2001

Emory Eye Center Hosts Neuro-Ophthalmology 2001 in December: A Post-Graduate Course for Physicians
The Emory Eye Center in Atlanta will host Neuro-Ophthalmology 2001, a conference designed for ophthalmologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons and any physicians interested in an update in neuro-ophthalmology, all day Friday, Dec. 7, 2001 at the Emory Conference Center Hotel.
FULL STORY

October 4, 2001

Emory Mini-Medical School Offers Today's Latest Topics in Medicine
Continue - or begin - your Emory Mini-Medical education this fall. Hosted again by Randy Martin, M.D., this fall's classes will cover frequently requested topics with an enormous impact on our health. Can vitamins and antioxidants keep you well? What does "alternative" medicine mean? How do you sort out advantages/risks? Hear how some Emory physicians are beginning to recognize and value "complementary" approaches to traditional treatments for disease. Can new advances in genetics help you predict your health risks - and tailor treatments for cancer or other health problems? How do new drugs and treatments get from an idea in some researcher's head through testing for effectiveness and safety, clinical trials, FDA approval, licensing, then to your Aunt Susie's bedside? What's hot in medicine these days? This and more, from some of Emory's leading medical faculty. Previous MiniMedical School courses or other experience not necessary.
FULL STORY

October 4, 2001

Families of Deployed Troops Need Support of Family, Friends, Co-Workers
There's no doubt that the expression "War is hell!" has particular meaning for the troops being deployed and their families. There are ways that Americans can help ease the pain for spouses, partners and children left behind.
FULL STORY

October 4, 2001

Patient Ambulatory Care Express (PACE) at Grady Hospital "Fast Tracks" Treatment of Minor Injuries
Visiting an emergency department in the event of a serious accident, toothache or some other nagging pain can be a trying experience for almost anyone. And waiting endless hours to be seen by a physician for a minor injury can be just as upsetting. Most people want their aches and pains addressed right away, without waiting, and without wasting excessive time.
FULL STORY

October 4, 2001

Seasonal Flu Vaccinations May Not Be Enough For Adults
School has started and children have their required immunizations. Now many adults are gearing up to receive their annual flu vaccine. But it's just as important for adults to make sure they have complete and updated immunization records for other preventable diseases, says Emory University physician Sharon Horesh. The National Coalition for Adult Immunization reports that more than 30,000 adults in the United States die from vaccine-preventable diseases or their complications each year.
FULL STORY



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