WHSC News and 
Information
 

WHSC News Releases for September




 

September 21, '00

EMORY TO PARTICIPATE IN NATIONWIDE STUDY OF STROKE PREVENTION IN CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE -
Emory University School of Medicine is among 20 sites participating in a nationwide, $11 million study of optimizing stroke prevention in children with sickle cell anemia.
FULL STORY
September 21, '00

SCIENTISTS UNCOVER POTENTIAL NEW HIV VACCINE TARGET -
Scientists have shown for the first time, using a nonhuman primate model, that the AIDS virus avoids the body's strongest immune responses during the first few weeks of infection through an evolutionary process of natural selection. The finding, which appears in the Sept. 21 issue of Nature, opens the door to new vaccine directions.
FULL STORY
September 21, '00

HEALTH CARE AND THE OLYMPICS:
Study finds walk-in visitis to health care facilities dropped during 1996 Atlanta Games
-
Walk-in visits to metro Atlanta health care facilities dropped during the 1996 Olympic Games, probably because some local residents temporarily raised their threshold of medical need, according to a study led by Emory physician Stephen R. Pitts, M.D., M.P.H.
FULL STORY
September 18, '00

A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF MEDICARE OUTPATIENT PRESCRIPTION DRUG PROPOSALS PROPOSED BY VICE-PRESIDENT GORE AND GOVERNOR BUSH -
Kennth E. Thorpe, Ph.D.
Robert W. Woodruff Professor
Chair, Department of Health Policy and Management
Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University
FULL STORY
September 18, '00

$7 MILLION NIH GRANT LINKS EMORY AND ATLANTA UNIVERSITY CENTER SCHOOLS IN FELLOWSHIP TRAINING PROGRAM -
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded nearly $7 million over five years to Emory University and five institutions within the Atlanta University Center (AUC) for an interdisciplinary postdoctoral training program. The new program is designed to increase the quantity and quality of fellows achieving careers in the biological and biomedical sciences and of teachers within undergraduate institutions serving minority students. The award represents the largest post-doctoral training grant in Emory's history, according to Robert Gunn, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Physiology in Emory University School of Medicine and principal investigator for the grant.
FULL STORY
September 18, '00

$16 MILLION GRANT TO SUPPORT GEORGIA TECH/EMORY DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING -
The Whitaker Foundation recently awarded a $16 million Leadership-Development Award to the Georgia Tech/Emory Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME). Through this extraordinary award, BME will add 17 faculty, more than doubling its size, and support student fellowships in the new joint Ph.D program. The funds also will help support major renovations at Emory and construction of a new building at Georgia Tech.
FULL STORY
September 18, '00

$1 MILLION GIFT FROM J.B. FUQUA TO FUND INITIATIVES IN AWARENESS AND TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION IN OLDER ADULTS -
Individuals who suffer from the medical condition knowns as clinical depression bear a double burden of public misunderstanding and social rejection. Often, the disease is misunderstood or even completely overlooked by health care professionals.
FULL STORY
September 18, '00

VIRTUAL COLONOSCOPY: Researchers study new, non-invasive way to examine colon for polyps -
Emory University researchers are participating in a nationwide, multi-site study of a new colon screening method that uses three-dimensional CT scanning instead of a rectally inserted scope to search for polyps.
FULL STORY
September 18, '00

"RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY AND HEALTH: THE CONNECTION AND WHY" -
Emory University Rollins School of Public Health
RUTH and O.C. HUBERT LECTURE IN RELIGION AND HEALTH - Reconciling the Link Between Religion and Health
FULL STORY
September 1, '00

SCIENTISTS DISCOVER CLUES TO BRAIN/BLOOD PATHWAYS THAT COULD PROVOKE STROKE DAMAGE -
Increasing scientific evidence demonstrates that serine proteases - a group of enzymes involved in blood clotting - may enter the brain during traumatic head injury and stroke, leading to enhanced brain damage. Emory University neuroscientists Stephen F. Traynelis, Ph.D. and Melissa B. Gingrich, Ph.D., in the September issue of the journal Trends in Neuroscience, outlined growing evidence for the role of serine proteases in scarring of brain tissue (glial scarring), edema (swelling), seizure and neuronal cell death.
FULL STORY
September 1, '00

NON-PATHOGENIC BACTERIA BLOCK INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE PATHWAY IN INTESTINAL TRACT -
A team of Emory University pathologists has discovered that non-pathogenic bacteria within the gastrointestinal tract may be responsible for blocking an immune pathway that otherwise could cause an unhealthy inflammatory response to the millions of bacteria normally present in the intestine. A breakdown in this mechanism for bacterial tolerance could play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) and other infectious intestinal diseases. The research was reported in the September 1 issue of the journal Science.
FULL STORY
September 1, '00

DRUG THERAPY SIGNIFICANTLY EXTENDS LIFESPAN OF WORMS -
Using drugs that help eliminate oxygen radicals - the toxic byproducts of metabolism - scientists have extended the normal lifespan of the nematode worm C. elegans by approximately 50 percent. In addition, the scientists restored a normal lifespan to mutant worms that had a mitochondrial defect causing increased oxygen radical production and rapid aging. The findings were reported in the September 1, 2000 issue of Science.
FULL STORY
September 1, '00

THE TRAUMA AND ANXIETY RECOVERY PROGRAM AT EMORY: SPECIALIZING IN POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER TREATMENT AND RESEARCH -
Recognizing the need for specialized treatment and research related to posttraumatic stress disorder, the Emory University School of Medicine has established the Trauma and Anxiety Recovery Program, headed by psychologist Barbara Rothbaum, Ph.D.
FULL STORY
September 1, '00

FIBROID EMBOLIZATION: Procedure for treating benign tumors of the uterus offers women effective, minimally invasive alternative to surgery -
One in four U.S. women develops fibroids, tumors of the uterus that almost always are non-cancerous and may not cause any health problems. For many women, however, fibroids can cause low back pain, excessive bleeding during periods, a sensation of pressure, painful intercourse and bowel and urinary problems.
FULL STORY

 



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